Word War: Compare To vs Compare With

When you point out the similarities of two or more objects, do you say compare to or compare with? Prepositions have always been the bane of second language speakers of English; a simple change of preposition in a sentence can change the entire meaning of the message. In this installment of Word War, we are... Continue Reading →

Word War: Intonation vs Accent

When you speak with a specific speech pattern, is it because of your intonation or your accent? Throughout my career as a communications trainer, I have met a lot of people who use intonation and accent interchangeably. Normally, my trainees tell me that they need to focus on their accent because their intonation is inconsistent. It... Continue Reading →

Word War: Pique vs Peak vs Peek

Today’s installment is a three-way word war among pique, peak, and peek—all enemies and pet peeves of editors. These homophones send writers into a spiral of uncertainty when it comes to word choice, particularly in the context of one expression: when something excites you and captures your attention, does it pique, peak, or peek your... Continue Reading →

Word War: On Behalf Of vs In Behalf Of

Today's installment of Word War is rather different as we are going to compare two phrases instead of standalone words. So let’s begin with the now clichéd engager: When you are representing your department, do you act on behalf of or in behalf of everyone else? Which of the two expressions is correct? Well, both... Continue Reading →

Word War: Continuously vs Continually

When you make the same mistake again and again, would you describe your behavior as something that happens continuously or continually? These terms, along with their adjective forms continual and continuous, are often used interchangeably in speech and writing, obviously because they both come from the verb continue. But style guides urge writers to practice... Continue Reading →

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